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  #21  
Old 04-26-2011, 01:11 PM
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dark matter covered in through the wormhole w/ morgan freeman.
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Old 04-26-2011, 01:21 PM
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You just trashed my on-topic 10 dimensional post with some irrelevant stuff about dark matter again. Why?

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Old 04-26-2011, 02:03 PM
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OK, I've cooled down now. Sorry.

Let's be clear. Dark Matter has NO RELEVANCE to 10 dimensional string theory. It's just heavy largely non-interacting particles like heavy neutrinos that do a book-keeping exercise in gravity theory. Back on-topic in a thread I find interesting enough to revive.

I've been watching "The Elegant Universe" which is a nice show. Everything about String Theory is pretty. I liked the way that the genius mathematician Leonhard Euler's Beta Function cropped up in strong interactions:



The Beta function is composed of Gamma functions which are a continuous factorial with an interesting value of Root Pi at value half. Then we move on to the crucial observation that the strong interaction and gravity share the same SO(32) 10D symmettry which is what 496 (half 31x32) as an answer tells you:



Lastly, I enjoyed looking at alternatives to small round objects within our own 3D/4D world. Strings are loops sometimes, a bit like doughnuts or vortices that Dolphins like playing with:



Very neat. I could say more about these Bubble Rings or Strings, because the way they interact is quite surprising and instructive.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XJk8ijAUCiI
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Old 04-29-2011, 03:12 PM
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Here we have the thread on the very structure of the Universe, and it's dying on it's feet! Why? Well in the eighties Prof Leo Susskind was one in a billion in string theory. Now String theorists are one in a million judging by viewing figures on YooToob. Hey, dat's me!



Here you can see the Quantum Operator for String Energy (Spin 2 Gravitons, in fact) behaves like Circular Polarisation with Photons. That's what the imaginary y component in the wave function tells you. Marvellous! Can't Wait for more lectures.

Apologies for Da Brooklyn accent I have picked up from Leonardo, I conclude that God may be from Brooklyn too, because dat is da language of SuperString theory...
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Old 04-29-2011, 03:15 PM
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I met Susskind earlier this week. Odd guy, even as string theorists go. Big ears.

Anyhow, what kind of instruction do you have in physics, System7?
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Old 04-29-2011, 03:31 PM
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You must tell us more about Susskind! I find him refreshingly free of bull************ and evidently very creative. Very good teacher. A personal buddy of Richard Feynman of course! It doesn't get much better than that!

Personally, I did a Physics degree at London University, mainly lab work in radioactivity and experiments in Quantum Hall Effect at low liquid Helium temperatures. Then a year of Telecommunications theory at Imperial College, which was mainly digital signal processing, filtering and antennas. I don't do submarine telephone cable engineering any more though. But still like the Physics and Maths.
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Old 04-29-2011, 03:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by system7 View Post
...But still like the Physics and Maths.
We have figured that out.
Personally I like reading astronomy and physics but I find things like string theory and 10 dimention spaces to be somewhat boring and very theoretical.
(but I have to mention that I dont quite have the required background knowledge to understand the math behind those theories).
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Old 04-29-2011, 03:58 PM
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Nerdmaster, you'd be interested to know that our Digital Filtering teacher at IC was Prof Anthony Constantinides. A brilliant maverick of a teacher with hugely entertaining strong views and a liking for wine after lunch. In fact most of us signed up for his obscure course on optimum network theory just for the fun of it.

I think everyone lacks in maths at any level of Physics. I never knew enough when I was studying, and was always slow to grind out the actual sums. But these days I can follow the Divergence of a field or a Hamiltonian or Lagrangian in wave mechanics even if I'm shaky on detail. The higher maths is actually simpler in the long run.

With good teachers like Susskind, he knows you don't get it all, but you have to trust him to get you there in a course. And do the background reading too. Like "The Elegant Universe" by Brian Greene, which is actually a bit dated now. It's probably a better thing to do than waste hours on Crysis or something, IMO, because String Theory is REAL and probably as good as it gets right now in Physics.
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Old 04-30-2011, 10:54 PM
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Quote:
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You must tell us more about Susskind! I find him refreshingly free of bull************ and evidently very creative. Very good teacher. A personal buddy of Richard Feynman of course! It doesn't get much better than that!
He's actually not that likeable of a guy. Extremely intelligent, sure, but a bit too in love with his own theory. He told a member of the audience at the public talk he gave to "go to hell" and I'm only half sure that he was joking.

Quote:
Personally, I did a Physics degree at London University, mainly lab work in radioactivity and experiments in Quantum Hall Effect at low liquid Helium temperatures. Then a year of Telecommunications theory at Imperial College, which was mainly digital signal processing, filtering and antennas. I don't do submarine telephone cable engineering any more though. But still like the Physics and Maths.
Well, it's good to have someone else here that can make informed statements about topics in physics!
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Old 05-01-2011, 01:40 PM
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I don't suppose Prof Susskind has had an easy life pursuing a topic that was in the doldrums for many years, and he probably needed a strong ego and a few bottles of wine to get over the early criticism or indifference of his work. But I like String Theory, because it combines geometry and symmetry with a simple particle model of strings/loops or perhaps a torus. I hope it works out.

I remember a talk I gave on Fractals when they were new, and we had little more than a pocket calculator to work out the details:



Only one member of the audience got it at all. It was an odd feeling to encounter general indifference at a fascinating piece of maths. I was quite bewildered. For all that, I'd now concede that fractals' time has not yet come.

Back on-topic, we seem to have 3 dimensions of extended space, 6 dimensions of looped space along with a dimension of time and an extra spatial dimension that is strangely different but important right now in 11D M-Theory. It's all coming along quite nicely!
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